Panorama Route Tour

Royal Safaris - Panorama Tour

Price: R1500.00 per person (min group size 4 pax)

  • Duration: 10 – 12 hours

  • Location: Panorama Route, Mpumalanga

Departure Return
07:00am 17:00pm
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A Brief Description of the Panorama Route Tour

We will depart at 07:00 from White River and set our route on one of the country’s most scenic drives, the Panorama Route, explores the Mpumalanga highlands, or the north-eastern section of the Great Escarpment of the Drakensberg. In these rugged mountains the plateau comes to an abrupt and dramatic halt, falling steeply away into the Lowveld accompanied by incredible views out over the grasslands of Africa.

To describe the natural attractions with the written word is difficult, but people recount being able to ‘touch the clouds’ whilst others have called the route the ‘most beautiful place in the world’.

Our Panorama Route Tour is specifically designed to ensure that our guests see some of the most popular attractions on this route and experience the scenic beauty of the landscape.

Lunch will be at a beautiful local eatery where you can relax and enjoy some of the local delicacies and famous South African wines or beers.

After visiting the below stops we will return back to White River around 17:00.

Royal Safari - Panorama Tour

Our Stops Will be

  • Lone Creek Falls

  • Three Rondavels

  • Bourke’s Luck Potholes

  • Lisbon Falls

  • Gods Window

  • The Pinnacle Rock

  • The Town of Graskop

Royal Safari - Panorama Tour

Included

  • Well experienced and knowledgeable Guide

  • Mineral Water

  • Entrance Fees at Attractions

  • Lunch at Harries

Excluded

  • All drinks at Lunch or Rest stops

Read More About Each Stop

Our first stop will be Lone Creek. Lone Creek Falls is one of most well-known landmarks of the forest area, and is located only 200m walk the parking area, thereby allowing for easy access for nature enthusiasts of all ages.

Only 9 km from Sabie on the old tarred road, the falls are only a short walk through a beautiful indigenous forest.

The waterfall has been declared a National Monument, and well take your breath away with its natural beauty. It reaches 68 m and is something truly exceptional to behold. Tour busses can easily reach the parking area before the falls, and visitors are welcome to enjoy the picnic facilities near the falls.

Both geological wonders are on the Panorama Route, a highly popular tourist drive to follow when exploring the province, and, depending on which way you choose to drive along the 16 kilometers of the Blyde River Canyon, the Three Rondavels either starts or ends your journey.

Exactly as they sound, the Three Rondavels are three round mountain tops with slightly pointed tops, very similar to the traditional round or oval African homesteads made with local materials called rondavels. They are sometimes also called the Three Sisters (although this confuses them with a similar threesome visible from the N1 in the Free State lower down in the country).

Once known as the chief and his three wives – the flat-topped peak represented Mapjaneng, famous for opposing invading Swazis in a memorable battle is on the right, whilst the rondavels are three of his more troublesome wives – Magabolle, Mogoladikwe and Maseroto.

The view point is spectacular. From here one looks over the canyon to the Three Rondavels on the other side of the northern edges of the Drakensberg range of mountains. An outlook that is overwhelmingly beautiful and deserves more than a moment’s respite.

The beautiful to look at formations are explained geographically as the slow erosion of underlying soft stone, leaving the exposed quartzite and shale rondavels at which we marvel. Whatever their origin, they are undoubtedly breathtaking. Together with God’s Window and Bourkes Luck Potholes, the Three Rondavels are a highlight of any trip along the third largest canyon in the world.

Bourke’s Luck Potholes are without doubt a major icon, but when thrown in together with the likes of the Three Rondawels, God’s Window, the Blyde River Canyon and numerous magnificent waterfalls, one can become immune after a while.

If you can, begin your wander around Mpumalanga with Bourke’s Luck Potholes, for they are without doubt incredible. Essentially they’re the result of decades of swirling eddies of water where the Treur River meets the Blyde River, the tumult of which has caused extensive water erosion over time. The result is a series of cylindrical rock sculptures that look as though they would be more comfortable on the moon.

They are on the Panorama Route and are one of the major tourist attractions in South Africa, so best get there ahead of the bus tours. A series of metal bridges take you right above them, if photographs are a high priority, whilst walkways around the ridges allow you various angles and viewpoints from which to take your snaps.

Their strange name, in case you were wondering, comes from the gold digger, Tom Burke, who staked a nearby claim.

Lisbon Falls is no exception and is actually one of the most dramatic and scenic waterfalls in the region. It is situated in the heart of the waterfall area of Mpumalanga, where the number of these dramatic falls exceeds that of anywhere else in southern Africa. Lisbon Falls is 94 metres, or 308 feet, high, which makes it one of the highest in the province.

Being located just north of Graskop and outside the ever-popular Blyde River Canyon Nature Reserve, Lisbon Falls is convenient and accessible to locals and to visitors from all over the world.

There are lovely trees nearby, under which a picnic with friends and family can be enjoyed while the vistas are savoured. Bird lovers are also invited to visit Lisbon Falls and to keep an eye out for the many exciting avian species that inhabit the Panorama Route.

With magnificent views, canyons, rock formations and waterfalls, God’s Window is truly an area of breathtaking scenic splendour. It is no wonder that Mpumalanga is known as Paradise Country.

Gods Window is so called for the panoramic view of the Lowveld more than 900 m down into lush indigenous forest clad ravine. The majestic cliffs plunge over 700 meters to the Lowveld and the private game reserves which have made the area one of South Africa’s main wildlife destinations. God’s Window is a small part of a 250km long earthwork of sheer cliffs and extravagant beauty. One can observe the hills and forests as far as the eye can see. In fact, it seems as if one can see forever!

Viewing sites are provided along the length of the spectacular Blyde River Canyon including God’s Window, and there are numerous fantastic walks, hiking, horse and mountain bike trails. From the parking area a very steep stepped footpath along the edge of the escarpment leads to the actual viewpoints.

For the best lookout points and exotic forest plants, steer away from the crowds and hike up into the clouds and the misty Rain Forest. Make sure you take a few refreshments along as it is very humid and an extremely steep and strenuous walk. God’s Window and Graskop are perfect en-route stopping points for those visiting the Kruger National Park.

There are curio stalls and toilet facilities at the parking area. Witness one of the most magnificent sites in South Africa. God’s Window is truly a popular sight and for good reason! One can spend hours here just admiring the unsurpassed scenery.

The Pinnacle Rock is a massive quartzite rock that erupts from the earth’s surface and reaches some 30 meters in height. It is a freestanding rock that towers over the dense indigenous forest of Driekop Gorge in a dramatic display of nature’s quirks and the unique splendour of South Africa. It is littered with stunning, brightly-colored aloes that not only add to the appeal amongst the local birds and insect species, but also make for extra beautiful photographs of the rock and its surrounds.

Royal Safari - Panorama Tour

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